:: HUMAN RIGHTS ::
The consequences of Turkey illegal invasion were devastating. Not least among these was the gross violation of human rights.
Refugees
With the invasion, Turkey forcibly expelled the Greek-Cypriots from north Cyprus to south Cyprus, which was about 80% of the indigenous population. About 200,000 people forced to live homeless and destitute. They didn't have anywhere to sleep for several days before they were given shelter in tented camps.

 
  Whilst the Cyprus government tried to help the families which were displaced in the best way they could due to the inadequate resources , the Turks were looting and usurping greek Cypriot property.
In its reports adopted on the 10th July, 1976 the Council of Europe stated that Turkey was responsible for the eviction of the Greek Cypriots from their homes and for the looting and deprivation of their possessions.
Turkey has been refused to comply the demands of Human Rights international organizations by flagrantly violating the basic human rights and fundamental freedoms of the Greek Cypriots including the freedom of movement, the freedom of settlement and the right to property.


Missing people
1588 Greek Cypriots still remain on the missing persons list making it one of the most painful issues in Cyprus today. Many of these people were either soldiers, reservists which were captured during the battles by the Turkish invasion force. Amongst them were civilians, women and children which were arrested by Turkish troops. There are many videos and photographs which show these people either being arrested or transferred to and imprisoned in Turkey. None of these people have ever returned. Relatives of Greek Cypriot missing persons have never been informed of the fate of their beloved ones.

 


The Turkish Government, in its refusal to recognize its obligation to account for the fate of Greek Cypriots held in its custody, is guilty of one of the most heinous crimes against humanity, the crime of enforced disappearance, a crime which has been recognized internationally, and is not subject to time limitation.
The Verde Report, which was submitted on September 1984 states: "Enforced disappearance is one of the most serious violations of the human rights safeguarded by international instruments: it in- fringes virtually on all the victims' personal rights and many of the rights of their families. The violations... cannot be justified by special circumstances, whether armed conflict, state of emergency or internal unrest or tension."


In refusing to recognize their obligations to account for the fate of the Greek Cypriots held in their custody, Turkey is guilty of one of the most serious crimes against humanity. The crime of enforced disappearance, a crime which has been recognized internationally, and is not subject to time limitation.
The Verde Report, which was submitted on September 1984 states: "Enforced disappearance is one of the most serious violations of the human rights safeguarded by international instruments: it in- fringes virtually on all the victims' personal rights and many of the rights of their families. The violations... cannot be justified by special circumstances, whether armed conflict, state of emergency or internal unrest or tension."

 


The families still wait. They want to know anything just to find out what happened to them or if some of these people are still alive.
"Our one and only demand is a profoundly human one. It is a simple demand for the full restoration and respect of the basic and fundamental human rights of the missing persons and ourselves. IS IT TOO MUCH TO ASK?"
Enclaved
After the hostilities of the Turkish invasion about 20.000 people mostly Greek Cypriots and some Maronites were cut off behind the military lines in their villages in the north part of Cyprus. They stayed in their homes with the hope that this situation would end and they would be able to carry on with their lives. But this never happened.

Instead Turkish invadors tried to force them by using different methods to make them leave their homes either by adopting a policy of oppression, violation of human rights and harassment of the enclaved. Following international pressure the Turkish leader agreed to improve the living conditions of the enclaved. But the Turkish side never implemented any of these measures. The enclaved are denied access to educational, medical, and religious facilities, they are subjected to restrictions regarding freedom of movement and are often harassed.

The result of this was that the enclaved people which remain in the occupied area today are 586. With this inhuman treatment lies a policy of ethnic cleansing ultimately aiming at the complete elimination of the Greek element in the northern occupied area of Cyprus.
By invading the Republic of Cyprus and occupying a large part of its territory Turkey has violated with impunity all international human rights conventions. For the restoration of human rights in Cyprus concerted action must be taken by the international community with the same determination that has been demonstrated elsewhere.